Saturday, September 09, 2006

No time

I don't have much time to keep this site updated anymore, what with four kids in four different schools, the demands of my job, and being in school myself four evenings a week.

I'm enrolled in two classes, plus one lab at Piedmont. I really thought I would hate it. Piedmont is so different from the small Jesuit college where I got my English degree. It turns out I don't hate it, nor do I feel uncomfortably old as I am far from being the oldest person in my classes and there are many people close to my age. Still, I am exhasuted most of the time .

My two youngest children have entered the public school system after having been homeschooled for the past two years. The older of the two seems to be thriving--has been busy making friends, is doing well in her classes, etc. The younger child, a second grade boy, is not measuring up to his teacher's expectations. He can't remember which baskets to put his folders in. He forgets to put a "P" next to his name on the attendence sheet, indicating that he packed his lunch. These are serious offenses in the second grade. I'm also annoyed about a note that came home recently. Attached to a list of common-sense tips for helping a child succeed in school (reading to him, supervising homework, limiting TV, etc) was the handwritten note, "Following these tips will make your child smarter..."

Really? Does the teacher really believe that? Or does she think me such an idiot that I am supposed to believe this? And this is my main problem with my youngest child's school: it serves a predominently low-income population, and the school attitude seems to be that they are saving our children from their terrible, sub-intelligent parents. It's not just this note, there have been other things.

If I weren't so tied up with school myself, I would take him right out and homeschool him until he can go to Walker.

2 comments:

  1. Patience wrote:And this is my main problem with my youngest child's school: it serves a predominently low-income population, and the school attitude seems to be that they are saving our children from their terrible, sub-intelligent parents.

    Teachers with that attitude in the Cville school system tend to teach the minimum (as compared to the standards you might set home schooling- Which would automatically be a lot higher than the city schools).

    The other thing is Cville city schools like to practice "Tracking" which means if they lable your student as a poor performer- they'll stick him in classes where the goal isn't to prepare the student for college, but simply to teach them the 'basics' so that they can figure out how to fill out a job application at the local McDonalds and pay taxes every year.

    And they have those divisions in every grade level, although they usually don't start naming them until high school- at which point they call it "General level" and "Advanced level." The General Level teachers are just babysitters. The Advanced level instructors actually teach.

    Good luck.

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  2. I am going to do a post soon on how much I love Piedmont. I found most professors smart, talented and certainly worthy of faculty at any four year university. I have to say I am jealous because back when I went to PVCC, the facilities were not so nice. Although that view from the library was priceless. OK enough reliving the days.

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