Thursday, October 29, 2009

House of plague


Mr. McP has returned to school but now Miss G is glassy-eyed and feverish, and Drama Queen and Mad Scientist are complaining of sore throats and cough. I think we're lucky to get this thing over with early in the season, although I worry about my girls because they have asthma. Drama Queen got pneumonia last winter after having the flu, but there was not a lot I could have done to prevent them getting it, since the vaccine takes two weeks to provide protection, I've been told, and the schools were supposed to start distributing after my kids were already exposed, and anyway, I've learned that they have run out.

As I said, I'm not too worried, and I'm glad that the people who commented on yesterday's entry feel more or less as I do. Let's hear it for common sense! Then again, I was thinking about my great-great-grandmother who lost four of her five children in the same week in an epidemic. Ironically, her surviving child, my great-grandfather, died at age 38 during the 1918 flu pandemic.

I feel well. Perhaps I'm immune. I was seven years old during the earlier swine flu outbreak in the 1970s, and maybe I caught it then, although they're saying it doesn't necessarily confer immunity for this outbreak. I don't remember being sick, but I do remember hearing about it on the news, so I imagine the coverage must have been frequent and obsessive, because what seven-year old pays attention to current events?

That's my handsome husband in the photo, btw.

6 comments:

  1. Here's to common sense. And accepting the risks of mortality;)

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  2. Let's hear it for common sense!

    There was a swine flu outbreak in the 70s? How could I not know that? So it's actually possible that Pete and I had it then and have some sort of immunity.

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  3. I don't remember hearing about it in the 1970s. I remember my mom was deathly ill with the flu one year - wonder if that was it?

    And how are we supposed to even know who has had H1N1 if they aren't even routinely testing for it when people show up with flu symptoms?? That's what I don't get. That right there proves there's no need to panic.
    I just read someone commenting on another site saying that ALL people testing positive for H1N1 have to be HOSPITALIZED. ha! As a nurse, can you imagine?? It frustrates me when people engage in panic-spreading with misinformation.
    Of course, when it's your own child, you worry, no matter what. I will feel really anxious if my kids get sick... with ANY flu. Never fun.

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  4. Tiff, I saw that comment on FB about all people with H1N1 needing to be hospitalized. There's no way! There aren't enough hospital beds in the world for that.

    I checked the CDC's website and one of their FAQ's is "Do I need to go to the ER if I have the flu" and they say NO--that only people who are seriously ill should go to the hospital and that mildly ill people should not go because they are taking resources from the truly ill. Then they list the warning signs that indicate you should go to the hospital.

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  5. I've heard that a few of my grandfather's younger siblings died during the flu outbreak in 1918.

    I watched Nightline the other night when they were interviewing the dr's and RN's that were taking care of flu patients on a pediatric floor. Those little kids were so sick.

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  6. Here's to common sense. And accepting the risks of mortality;) Work from home India

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