Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Checking in

Hey folks, just checking in. Things got a bit crazy around here. First, my car needed a new clutch, so I was without a car for several days and had to walk two and from work each day. Walking six miles a day really cut into my blogging time. On the heels of that, Jon fell while walking home and broke his foot pretty badly. You may recall that he broke his foot a year ago, right before I left for Iceland. This is a completely new and different injury. He has a Lisfranc fracture, which is when the ligament that holds your metatarsals to the tarsals is torn and the bones are ripped apart. He must be completely non-weight bearing on his broken foot for the next eight weeks or so. Which means that any type of household job that involves driving, or standing on two legs (walking the dogs, mowing the lawn) is now done 100% by me.

The injured part is that gappy bit where the knobbly bones meet the long skinny ones.


Not to make this all about me. We didn't realize, at first, that his foot was broken, so Jon spent all Wednesday night at home without treatment, which wasn't too bad until the middle of the night when the agonizing muscle spasms started. Thursday morning, I dropped him at the ER and went off to work.  That might seem heartless, but we both worked there, so it's a familiar place and holds no fear for us. They got him diagnosed and put in a temporary cast and given crutches and by mid-morning and he just went straight upstairs to work.

Jon's having surgery to repair his foot on Thursday, if his general health allows, which it might not. His blood pressure was really high at his pre-surgery workup. One thing I haven't mentioned here is that we found out a few years ago that he has an aneurysm in his ascending aorta, right where it's leaving the heart. There's a doctor monitoring the aneurysm and it's been stable. If it gets bigger, he'd need a surgical repair. Anyway, all this is rather worrisome when you're facing the additional stress of surgery. And work is really difficult for him too. He's a consult nurse, so he's not providing direct bedside care, but getting around on crutches is really difficult. He uses a wheelchair in the hospital, but has to also carry his crutches so he can get into patient rooms and other tight spaces. It generally sucks. We're trying to borrow a knee scooter from someone who doesn't need it anymore. If that doesn't work, we'll order one from amazon. They're literally six times more expensive if you get one from a medical supply store. Even the doctor told Jon to just find one on Craigslist.

Ian and I did go to Richmond on Saturday to have lunch with Seamus and Grace. That's been another big worry, watching Seamus adjust to college and dorm life. We did have a wonderful lunch at Perly's Delicatessen, which I highly recommend if you're ever in Richmond. Jon had to stay home though. Then we walked from Grace's house to Maymont, an old estate turned into a public park and garden, and walked around for a bit - another RVA experience that I recommend if you're ever in the area.


Maymont


10 comments:

  1. I love Maymont. If you ever get the chance to attend a concert there, do so!

    I know JABA used to have equipment they would loan out - walkers, wheelchairs, etc. Might as well contact them about the scooter.

    I hope Jon's surgery goes well.

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  2. What a horrible week, with more to come for Jon. I hope he can have surgery and that all goes well.

    I haven't been to Maymont in years and I miss it.

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  3. This all sounds quite difficult and worrisome.

    My church has a Durable Medical Equipment Lending Library. I know we are not anywhere near you, but I wonder if a church near you has something similar.

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  4. He's walking around with an aortic aneurysm? I thought those were deadly!

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    1. They are deadly, but you can live for years with a stable one. They monitor it and if it reaches a certain size, they do surgery to fix it. Based on what I remember from working in the ER, there are warning symptoms when your aorta is about to blow.

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  5. Ugh, that is a nasty break. I suffered one about 7 years ago and unfortunately healing was a very slow motion disaster film. Good wishes to him.

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    1. Thanks! Watching him try to get around now is a bit of a slow motion disaster film.

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